From Gawker With Love
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“I gotta say that for it being AIDS day, it is very pretty and sunny outside.”

My good friend Riki

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N+1's History of Gawker

This was a surprisingly insightful peek behind the curtain of Gawker, which has been background noise in my life since 2004 or so.

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tumblrbot asked: WHERE WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO VISIT ON YOUR PLANET?

Hm, Hong Kong, since a good friend of mine lives there and I simply can’t afford to visit her. If she didn’t live there, my interest would be minimal, but I would LOVE spending a long weekend with her in her new hometown.

Oh tumblrbot, where did you learn the secrets to getting strangers to divulge such personal information about themselves?

utnereader:

When Smart Kids Grow Up: Were you one of those students who made schoolwork look easy, earning  a galaxy of gold stars and an alphabet of A’s between your first  morning of kindergarten and your graduation day? Did everyone gush over  how smart you were?
If so, you might know the curse of the gifted child. An  overload of affirmations can hamper the future success of bright kids,  reports Heidi Grant Halvorson for Harvard Business Review. Students who receive praise for intellect rather than effort,  she reports, develop a belief that their abilities are innate and  unchangeable. As adults, they lose confidence in trying to develop new,  difficult skills. They get stuck. Halvorson writes:

People with above-average aptitudes—the ones we recognize as  being especially clever, creative, insightful, or otherwise  accomplished—often judge their abilities not only more harshly, but  fundamentally differently, than others do (particularly in Western  cultures). Gifted children grow up to be more vulnerable, and less  confident, even when they should be the most confident people in the  room.

Keep reading …



The drama of the gifted manchild…

utnereader:

When Smart Kids Grow Up: Were you one of those students who made schoolwork look easy, earning a galaxy of gold stars and an alphabet of A’s between your first morning of kindergarten and your graduation day? Did everyone gush over how smart you were?

If so, you might know the curse of the gifted child. An overload of affirmations can hamper the future success of bright kids, reports Heidi Grant Halvorson for Harvard Business Review. Students who receive praise for intellect rather than effort, she reports, develop a belief that their abilities are innate and unchangeable. As adults, they lose confidence in trying to develop new, difficult skills. They get stuck. Halvorson writes:

People with above-average aptitudes—the ones we recognize as being especially clever, creative, insightful, or otherwise accomplished—often judge their abilities not only more harshly, but fundamentally differently, than others do (particularly in Western cultures). Gifted children grow up to be more vulnerable, and less confident, even when they should be the most confident people in the room.

Keep reading …

The drama of the gifted manchild…

young gifted and white
housingworksbookstore:

Blocking traffic on Broadway outside City Hall at Occupy World AIDS Day marchPhoto by Sam Lewis (by samglewis)

Note on the right the fabulous Felix Rivera (whose Youtube-documented attack by rabid officer Tony Baloney helped spark Occupy Wall Street).

housingworksbookstore:

Blocking traffic on Broadway outside City Hall at Occupy World AIDS Day march
Photo by Sam Lewis (by samglewis)

Note on the right the fabulous Felix Rivera (whose Youtube-documented attack by rabid officer Tony Baloney helped spark Occupy Wall Street).

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